Past Exhibitions

For this year’s Gallery Weekend Berlin, Galerie Thomas Schulte will present a solo exhibition by Rebecca Horn. In addition to recent works, some of Horn’s most famous kinetic installations from the 1990s will be on view, including Bee’s Planetary Map (1998) and Tower of the Nameless (1994). In 1991, Thomas Schulte opened the gallery with Horn’s unforgettable installation Choir of the Locusts in Mommsenstraße in Berlin-Charlottenburg; the first exhibition ever to be held there. Almost 30 years and many joint projects later, the gallery continues its active collaboration with one of Germany’s most important artists.

 

With her encompassing kinetic sculpture Bee’s Planetary Map / Die Stämme der Bienen unterwandern die Maulwurfsarbeit der Zeit, Horn has created an ephemeral monument to the refugees of the Yugoslavian wars. Sixteen inverted straw baskets that look like beehives are suspended from the ceiling at various heights. Each basket carries inside a light bulb, casting pools of light onto the ground. On the floor beneath each basket circular mirror, which now and then rotates, catches the light, and reflects it in constantly moving circles and oblongs on the walls and ceiling. Throughout the room, the insistent buzzing of a swarm of bees can be heard. Every few minutes, a small rock attached to a cable falls from the ceiling to hit one of the mirrors. Around it, strewn pieces of broken glass accumulate. On one of the walls, a poem by Horn provides a textual counterpoint: “The bees have lost their equilibrium / They swarm in dense clouds high above / Their luminous basket hives are deserted / One of their centres is being destroyed forever anew… .”

In a poetic and theatrical way, Horn—through the image of the buzzing bees—evokes a feeling of uprootedness and nomadism, of freedom and the desire for security and protection, for belonging and order.

First shown in Vienna in 1994 and now installed in the gallery’s 9-meter high Corner Space, Horn’s Tower of the Nameless is a pyramid of ladders resembling a branched tree. The violins mounted on the ladders play croakingly—a reference to the unspeakable suffering caused by war and hardship. The installation becomes a symbol for all the fugitives and homeless who have lost their identity.

  • Artist Profile
  • For this year’s Gallery Weekend Berlin, Galerie Thomas Schulte will present a solo exhibition by Rebecca Horn. In addition to recent works, some of Horn’s most famous kinetic installations from the 1990s will be on view, including Bee’s Planetary Map (1998) and Tower of the Nameless (1994). In 1991, Thomas Schulte opened the gallery with Horn’s unforgettable installation Choir of the Locusts in Mommsenstraße in Berlin-Charlottenburg; the first exhibition ever to be held there. Almost 30 years and many joint projects later, the gallery continues its active collaboration with one of Germany’s most important artists.

     

    With her encompassing kinetic sculpture Bee’s Planetary Map / Die Stämme der Bienen unterwandern die Maulwurfsarbeit der Zeit, Horn has created an ephemeral monument to the refugees of the Yugoslavian wars. Sixteen inverted straw baskets that look like beehives are suspended from the ceiling at various heights. Each basket carries inside a light bulb, casting pools of light onto the ground. On the floor beneath each basket circular mirror, which now and then rotates, catches the light, and reflects it in constantly moving circles and oblongs on the walls and ceiling. Throughout the room, the insistent buzzing of a swarm of bees can be heard. Every few minutes, a small rock attached to a cable falls from the ceiling to hit one of the mirrors. Around it, strewn pieces of broken glass accumulate. On one of the walls, a poem by Horn provides a textual counterpoint: “The bees have lost their equilibrium / They swarm in dense clouds high above / Their luminous basket hives are deserted / One of their centres is being destroyed forever anew… .”

    In a poetic and theatrical way, Horn—through the image of the buzzing bees—evokes a feeling of uprootedness and nomadism, of freedom and the desire for security and protection, for belonging and order.

    First shown in Vienna in 1994 and now installed in the gallery’s 9-meter high Corner Space, Horn’s Tower of the Nameless is a pyramid of ladders resembling a branched tree. The violins mounted on the ladders play croakingly—a reference to the unspeakable suffering caused by war and hardship. The installation becomes a symbol for all the fugitives and homeless who have lost their identity.

    Works in Exhibition

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